Ginault 7275 Operation Manual

 

Over the past months, we have received many inquiries on how to operate the movement and what is the best way to use it. (lengthening the time needed in between services) We have decided to write a simple operation manual and some tips on the DOs and DON’Ts for our users.

 

Ginault caliber 7275 is a clone of ETA 2824-2 movement. The way to operate it is identical to ETA 2824-2.

 

 

How to Manually Wind the Watch

 

When the Ocean Rover is shipped out to you the crown is fully locked, and watch is in a hermetically sealed condition. To wind the movement, first turn the crown counterclockwise. The crown should pop out to its first position. Turn the crown clockwise to wind. A full wind takes about 16 to 20 turns. As you power up the movement through turning of the crown, the resistance you get from turning the crown will increase. This is because the mainspring is now getting tighter and tighter.

 

Now some members asked, can you over-wind the movement and break the mainspring? The answer is yes and no. The movement has a slip-clutch designed to prevent over-winding.

 

However, we have worked on repair cases in the past where the slip-clutch failed to function properly. For the most part, the slip-clutch is there to protect the movement from being over-wound. Just like parachutes, sometimes they do fail to open. When you feel the resistance while turning the crown getting stronger and stronger, it is a good idea to slow down or stop.

 

Some members have also reported to us that they tend to hear the rotor noise when the power reserve is low. This is because when the power reserve is low, the mainspring is loose, the rotor in the back turns more easily. When the power reserve is healthy or full, the rotor in the back also turns less due to a tighter mainspring.

 

Caliber 7275 based on ETA 2824-2 design is an automatic movement with a manual winding function. Unlike a pure manual wound movement, the 2824 design although robust is not without its Achilles heel. The gear chain from the crown to the spring barrel on this movement is fairly weak. This means long-term stress done through constant manual winding will cause the movement to fail sooner.

 

If you wear the watch daily for 10 hours or more, there will be no need to manually wind the movement at all after the initial manual winding when you first received the watch. The power reserve will constantly be replenished via its automatic winding while it’s on the wrist. You shouldn’t ever need to manually wind the movement again and the movement should be running on a healthy power reserve consistently.

 

 

If you only plan to wear the watch once every 2-3 days or less there are two approaches here.

 

1. you can just give it a gentle shake to start up the movement and wear it. Let the wrist movement power up the watch. The plus side of this method is that you reduce the wear and tear on the crown, stem, and winding gearbox. The downside is it will take a while for the movement to reach a healthy power reserve hence will suffer some accuracy issue (isochronism) before reaching so.

 

2. Some suggest to manually wind the movement a few turns, (around 5-10 turns) to get it started before wearing and let the automatic winding power up the rest while on your wrist. With that boost form manual winding, you should reach a healthy power reserve via wrist movement sooner. This approach definitely lessens the stress and wear put on the winding mechanism compare to a full manual wind; however, the downside is any manual winding will still cause stress and wear on the movement’s gearbox.

 

We do not recommend putting the watch on a winder as it may cause the movement to be magnetized. In theory most winding boxes on the market today are shielded to prevent against the magnetic field generated by the electric motors. However, in reality, we have seen a great number of “inferior” boxes being made which are price driven and not quality driven. If your winder does in fact magnetize your timepiece, it can be a costly repair and often isn’t covered by the warranty.

 

 

How to Quick Adjust the Date

 

From the winding position, pull the crown outwards half clutch, this should put the crown into the date quick adjust the position. Turn the crown clockwise to adjust the date.

 

Do NOT change the date while the watch is in the 8PM to 2AM time zone. Changing date using the quick date adjust while the watch is in this time zone has a very high chance of destroying the date changing gears inside the movement. If you are not sure if your watch is currently in the AM zone or the PM zone, play it safe and turn the minute and hour hands all the way until you are sure the hands are in the AM side.

 

 

How to Adjust the Minute/Hour Hands

 

From the quick date adjust position, pull the crown outwards one full clutch, this brings the crown to the hand adjusting the position or hacking position as we call it. In the hacking position, the second hand will stop. You can turn the crown clockwise or counterclockwise to adjust the hands as long as you know if your hands are in the AM or PM zone.

 

When pulling out the crown, it is important to make sure you pull it out straight. Try to avoid any lateral force up or down while pulling. This puts the stem of the movement under duress and may cause damage over time.

 

It is also important to make sure to lock the crown back in tightly after doing any adjustment with time and date or winding. A crown that is not fully locked down voids the waterproof ability.

 

 

Final Note

 

Mechanical movements are extremely prone to magnetism. If a movement is magnetized it will run wildly. Try to keep the watch away from magnets. There are many hidden magnets inside electronics such as cell phones, speakers, laptops, and airport scanners.

 

If you own mechanical watches, it is always a good idea to learn to check if the watch is magnetized (properly, not with a cell phone app) and how to demagnetize the watch properly. It’s easy to learn and a handy skill to have.

Ginault 7275 Operation Manual

 

Over the past months, we have received many inquiries on how to operate the movement and what is the best way to use it. (lengthening the time needed in between services) We have decided to write a simple operation manual and some tips on the DOs and DON’Ts for our users.

 

Ginault caliber 7275 is a clone of ETA 2824-2 movement. The way to operate it is identical to ETA 2824-2.

 

 

How to Manually Wind the Watch

 

When the Ocean Rover is shipped out to you the crown is fully locked, and watch is in a hermetically sealed condition. To wind the movement, first turn the crown counterclockwise. The crown should pop out to its first position. Turn the crown clockwise to wind. A full wind takes about 16 to 20 turns. As you power up the movement through turning of the crown, the resistance you get from turning the crown will increase. This is because the mainspring is now getting tighter and tighter.

 

Now some members asked, can you over-wind the movement and break the mainspring? The answer is yes and no. The movement has a slip-clutch designed to prevent over-winding.

 

However, we have worked on repair cases in the past where the slip-clutch failed to function properly. For the most part, the slip-clutch is there to protect the movement from being over-wound. Just like parachutes, sometimes they do fail to open. When you feel the resistance while turning the crown getting stronger and stronger, it is a good idea to slow down or stop.

 

Some members have also reported to us that they tend to hear the rotor noise when the power reserve is low. This is because when the power reserve is low, the mainspring is loose, the rotor in the back turns more easily. When the power reserve is healthy or full, the rotor in the back also turns less due to a tighter mainspring.

 

Caliber 7275 based on ETA 2824-2 design is an automatic movement with a manual winding function. Unlike a pure manual wound movement, the 2824 design although robust is not without its Achilles heel. The gear chain from the crown to the spring barrel on this movement is fairly weak. This means long-term stress done through constant manual winding will cause the movement to fail sooner.

 

If you wear the watch daily for 10 hours or more, there will be no need to manually wind the movement at all after the initial manual winding when you first received the watch. The power reserve will constantly be replenished via its automatic winding while it’s on the wrist. You shouldn’t ever need to manually wind the movement again and the movement should be running on a healthy power reserve consistently.

 

 

If you only plan to wear the watch once every 2-3 days or less there are two approaches here.

 

1. you can just give it a gentle shake to start up the movement and wear it. Let the wrist movement power up the watch. The plus side of this method is that you reduce the wear and tear on the crown, stem, and winding gearbox. The downside is it will take a while for the movement to reach a healthy power reserve hence will suffer some accuracy issue (isochronism) before reaching so.

 

2. Some suggest to manually wind the movement a few turns, (around 5-10 turns) to get it started before wearing and let the automatic winding power up the rest while on your wrist. With that boost form manual winding, you should reach a healthy power reserve via wrist movement sooner. This approach definitely lessens the stress and wear put on the winding mechanism compare to a full manual wind; however, the downside is any manual winding will still cause stress and wear on the movement’s gearbox.

 

We do not recommend putting the watch on a winder as it may cause the movement to be magnetized. In theory most winding boxes on the market today are shielded to prevent against the magnetic field generated by the electric motors. However, in reality, we have seen a great number of “inferior” boxes being made which are price driven and not quality driven. If your winder does in fact magnetize your timepiece, it can be a costly repair and often isn’t covered by the warranty.

 

 

How to Quick Adjust the Date

 

From the winding position, pull the crown outwards half clutch, this should put the crown into the date quick adjust the position. Turn the crown clockwise to adjust the date.

 

Do NOT change the date while the watch is in the 8PM to 2AM time zone. Changing date using the quick date adjust while the watch is in this time zone has a very high chance of destroying the date changing gears inside the movement. If you are not sure if your watch is currently in the AM zone or the PM zone, play it safe and turn the minute and hour hands all the way until you are sure the hands are in the AM side.

 

 

How to Adjust the Minute/Hour Hands

 

From the quick date adjust position, pull the crown outwards one full clutch, this brings the crown to the hand adjusting the position or hacking position as we call it. In the hacking position, the second hand will stop. You can turn the crown clockwise or counterclockwise to adjust the hands as long as you know if your hands are in the AM or PM zone.

 

When pulling out the crown, it is important to make sure you pull it out straight. Try to avoid any lateral force up or down while pulling. This puts the stem of the movement under duress and may cause damage over time.

 

It is also important to make sure to lock the crown back in tightly after doing any adjustment with time and date or winding. A crown that is not fully locked down voids the waterproof ability.

 

 

Final Note

 

Mechanical movements are extremely prone to magnetism. If a movement is magnetized it will run wildly. Try to keep the watch away from magnets. There are many hidden magnets inside electronics such as cell phones, speakers, laptops, and airport scanners.

 

If you own mechanical watches, it is always a good idea to learn to check if the watch is magnetized (properly, not with a cell phone app) and how to demagnetize the watch properly. It’s easy to learn and a handy skill to have.